The Mathematics Program

Mathematics, the study of numbers and shapes, and the language of the physical sciences, has emerged from its classical roots as the principle tool for the analysis and comprehension of many current problems. Chaos and fractals, cryptography, data compression algorithms, tomography and turbulence are only a few of the many areas currently studied by mathematicians. In addition, promising research continues to be done in the fields of analysis, topology, algebra and number theory. These exciting areas of study all utilize the fundamentals of mathematics within a rigorous logical structure.

What Can I Do With a Degree in Mathematics?

The Department of Mathematics prepares the student by teaching the ability to comprehend and use the language of mathematics. Students will come to appreciate the logical structure and beauty of the mathematical development. The student will come to formulate the needed mathematical methods to analyze and solve real problems.

The courses offered prepare mathematics majors for graduate studies, research, engineering, teaching and positions in industry and government. They also provide the necessary background for students in engineering and the social and physical sciences. Finally, the courses allow for the study of mathematics for its own sake.

Resultsmath-results
Mathematics Results
  • Our math graduates have gone to work in many different fields and positions, such as network security software developer, engineering, actuary, college professor, high school teacher, physician, corporate manager, attorney, banker, economic analyst and college president. 
  • Those who went to graduate school were accepted into numerous high quality universities (e.g., University of Albany, American University, University of Arizona, Boston College, Bowling Green, Brandeis, Brown, Carnegie Mellon, Cornell, Duke, University of Florida, George Mason, Indiana University at Bloomington, University of Kentucky, University of Maryland, University of Michigan, University of North Carolina, Ohio University, Princeton University, Rice, Purdue, SUNY at Albany, Syracuse, Texas A&M, University of Virginia, Washington University, Westchester University, William and Mary). 
  • 75% of our full-time faculty has a Ph.D. in Mathematics and is active in their research, publishing regularly in national and international refereed math journals. 
Curriculummath-curriculum
Major Requirements for a Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science Degree in Mathematics

Requirements for a Bachelor of Arts Degree in Mathematics

Major Requirements (44 credits)
MA 111 Calculus I* - 4 credits
MA 112 Calculus II - 4 credits
MA 113 Calculus III - 4 credits
MA 114 Ordinary and Partial Differential Equations - 4 credits
MA 115 Linear Algebra - 3 credits

Two of the following four courses - 8 credits
MA 201 Abstract Algebra I - 4 credits
MA 202 Abstract Algebra II - 4 credits
MA 206 Real Analysis I - 4 credits
MA 207 Real Analysis II - 4 credits

Two of the following five courses - 6 credits
MA 117 Methods of Proof - 3 credits
MA 203 Complex Variables - 3 credits
MA 204 Topology - 3 credits
MA 208 Probability and Statistics - 3 credits
MA 210 Euclidean and Non-Euclidean Geometry - 3 credits
MA 223 Mechanics: Statics - 3 credits
MA 224 Mechanics: Dynamics - 3 credits

One of these two computing science courses - 3 credits
CS 110 Computing and Information Science I - 3 credits
CS 270 Introduction to Numerical Computation - 3 credits

Two series (i.e., two courses with respective labs) out of these six** - 8 credits
BL 150 & 151 General Biology I & Lab - 4 credits
BL 152 & 153 General Biology II & Lab - 4 credits
CH 101 & 103 General Chemistry I & Lab - 4 credits
CH 102 & 104 General Chemistry II & Lab - 4 credits
PH 111 & 113 General Physics I & Lab - 4 credits
PH 112 & 114 General Physics II & Lab - 4 credits

* Calculus I is a 4 credit course with 3 credits fulfilling the mathematics core.
** These 8 credits are fulfilling the science core curriculum requirement.

Requirements for a Bachelor of Science Degree in Mathematics 

Major Requirements (59 credits)
MA 111 Calculus I* - 4 credits
MA 112 Calculus II - 4 credits
MA 113 Calculus III - 4 credits
MA 114 Ordinary and Partial Differential Equations - 4 credits
MA 115 Linear Algebra - 3 credits
MA 201 Abstract Algebra I - 4 credits
MA 202 Abstract Algebra II - 4 credits
MA 203 Complex Variables - 3 credits
MA 204 Topology - 3 credits
MA 206 Real Analysis I - 4 credits
MA 207 Real Analysis II - 4 credits
MA 208 Probability and Statistics - 3 credits
PH 111 & 113 General Physics I & Lab** - 4 credits

One of these two computing science courses - 3 credits
CS 110 Computing and Information Science I - 3 credits
CS 270 Introduction to Numerical Computation - 3 credits

Two other series (i.e., two courses with respective labs) out of these five** - 8 credits
BL 150 & 151 General Biology I & Lab - 4 credits
BL 152 & 153 General Biology II & Lab - 4 credits
CH 101 & 103 General Chemistry I & Lab - 4 credits
CH 102 & 104 General Chemistry II & Lab - 4 credits
PH 112 & 114 General Physics II & Lab - 4 credits

* Calculus I is a 4 credit course with 3 credits fulfilling the mathematics core.
** 8 of these 12 science credits are fulfilling the science core curriculum.

Requirements for Minor in Mathematics (at least 18 credits)
MA 111 Calculus I - 4 credits
MA 112 Calculus II - 4 credits
MA 113 Calculus III - 4 credits

Two of the following courses:
MA 114 Ordinary and Partial Differential Equations - 4 credits
MA 115 Linear Algebra - 3 credits
MA 117 Methods of Proof - 3 credits
MA 201 Abstract Algebra I - 4 credits
MA 202 Abstract Algebra II - 4 credits
MA 203 Complex Variables - 3 credits
MA 204 Topology - 3 credits
MA 206 Real Analysis I - 4 credits
MA 207 Real Analysis II - 4 credits
MA 208 Probability and Statistics - 3 credits

Teacher Preparation
All students who are interested in pursuing the teacher certification should refer to the education certification information. The required Mathematics courses would be MA 111, MA 112, MA 113, MA 114, MA 115, MA 201, MA 206, MA 208 and MA 210. Other courses in other disciplines are also required.
 

Typical Freshman Schedulemath-freshman-schedule

Fall
CH 101 General Chemistry I - 3 credits
CH 103 General Chemistry I Laboratory - 1 credit
MA 111 Calculus I - 4 credits
EL 102 Language & Rhetoric - 3 credits
One or two more core classes - 3 or 6 credits
Total Fall 14 or 17 credits

Spring
CH 102 General Chemistry II - 3 credits
CH 104 General Chemistry II Laboratory - 1 credit
MA 112 Calculus II - 4 credits
TH 119 First Theology - 3 credits
One or two more core classes - 3 or 6 credits
Total Spring 14 or 17 credits

All students will take one three (3) credit course designated as a Freshman Seminar which will satisfy a core curriculum requirement.

Prerequisitesmath-prerequisites
Program Prerequisites
As a culminating activity, mathematics majors must take Abstract Algebra I or Real Analysis I during the first semester of their senior year. 
Internships and Careers in Mathematics

Saint Vincent students have participated in internships at a variety of top tier research institutions and cutting edge industry in the field of bioinformatics, including Johns Hopkins University, Cornell University, the Pittsburgh Tissue Engineering Initiative, Allegheny General Hospital and the Immune Tolerance Network. Students in our program combine the advantages of a small college atmosphere with the opportunities to do internships at nationally and internationally recognized institutions.

  • Learning Objectives

    Students earning a degree in mathematics will:

    • know the definitions of fundamental concepts and the major theorems of the core areas of undergraduate mathematics as outlined in course syllabi;
    • be able to prove various propositions in the core areas of undergraduate mathematics and will appreciate the need for rigorous proof;
    • be able to analyze and solve problems in the core areas of undergraduate mathematics; and
    • have working knowledge of at least one mathematical "language" (beyond entry level) and its inherent tools, as well as an appreciation for both the utility and beauty of mathematics.